The Australian music industry’s benevolent fund Support Act Ltd has a struck a new major partnership with global denim brand Levi Strauss & Co.

With its alarming data on the mental health, alienation and socially dysfunctional lifestyles led by people in the Australian music industry, Support Act announced the need for a new 24 hour well-being service.

The first to come on board were the former owners of Alberts label and publishing, the Albert Family, through the Tony Foundation.

Now Levi's has committed funding and expertise to help Support Act launch the well-being service.

In particular, Levi's is keen to ensure that all Australian artists and music workers experiencing mental health problems are made aware of that the new service is in existence, and are encouraged to access it.

Joanna Cave, support act chief executive said: “We are incredibly grateful to be able to partner with a super brand such as Levi’s, which has stepped up and shown its commitment to the well-being of the Australian music community.

“Levi's involvement will enable us to reach the widest possible audience, using the most sophisticated channels, opportunities which we simply cannot afford on our own.

“It is heartening to see international corporations taking their social responsibilities so seriously.

“Levi's support will make a huge difference to artists and music workers in crisis".

Nicky Rowsell, marketing manager at Levi’s Australia & NZ added, “Levi’s as a brand has a genuine love of music, and so it makes perfect sense for us to support all members of the music community in any way we can.

“We are committed to giving back holistically and are proud to partner with Support Act in developing a 24/7 help line and service that is the first of its type in Australia.

“This is a critical first step in helping this growing and widely suffered health epidemic.

“We look forward to being able to make a genuine difference in this space over the coming years.”

The apparel company has long been a socially active brand globally.

In the ‘40s it desegregated its factories so black and white workers worked together.

In 1980s, it was heavily involved in educating people about AIDS, donating $37 million to HIV/AIDS services.

It was one of the first companies to extend healthcare to the spouses of their 10,000-strong worldwide workforce.