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News May 24, 2022

35% of Music Industry Has Been Exposed to Unsafe Working Conditions (EXCLUSIVE)

Senior Journalist, B2B
35% of Music Industry Has Been Exposed to Unsafe Working Conditions (EXCLUSIVE)

Photo by Dark Rider on Unsplash

The Mental Health and Wellbeing in Music and Live Performing Arts survey has revealed some stark findings about the state of the industry.

The survey of 1,304 people who work in the music and live performing arts industries took place across March and April and was facilitated by Support Act and the Centre for Social Impact at Swinburne.

One of the more dire findings was that 35% of respondents had been exposed to unsafe working conditions over the past 12 months.

Separately, 28% said they had been exposed to bullying, half of whom said it came from managers or other people in positions of power in the workplace.

In addition, 15% reported unwanted sexual attention. Two thirds of these respondents said this behaviour was from members of the public and one third said it came from peers, and 20% said it came from managers and other people in positions of power in the workplace. Respondents were able to select more than one option, which accounts for the percentages.

There were also reports of racism (14%) and ageism (32%).

Only 15% of overall respondents said they felt safe at work all of the time.

Looking at the economic state of the industry, over a third of the respondents reported incomes from their work in the music and live sector as less than $30,000 per annum.

Almost one third (31%) said they were worried to a large or very large extent about becoming unemployed. A further 47% said they had an unpredictable work schedule.

Clive Miller, the CEO of Support Act, told The Industry Observer that the startling statistics further confirmed the many and varied challenges facing the sector after a difficult few years.

“They also highlight the urgent need to continue to support the mental health and wellbeing of music and arts workers through access to industry-specific psychological services, as well as evidence-based prevention, education and training programs, such as the ones that Support Act provides.

“We hope that governments, industry and music lovers across Australia will continue to support our efforts to help create more mentally healthy workplaces that prioritise psychological safety and wellbeing.”

The full results of the Mental Health and Wellbeing in Music and Live Performing Arts will be unveiled at Support Act’s Head First conference in Sydney on Wednesday.

The full program can be accessed here and you can buy tickets here.

This article originally appeared on The Industry Observer, which is now part of The Music Network.

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