News August 19, 2021

Rob Hirst, Missy Higgins, Katie Noonan & Montaigne among new ambassadors for Green Music

Rob Hirst, Missy Higgins, Katie Noonan & Montaigne among new ambassadors for Green Music

Clockwise from top left: Rhoda Roberts AO, John Butler, Montaigne, Katie Noonan, Rob Hirst & Missy Higgins

Green Music Australia has unveiled its new high-profile ambassadors who will aim to harness the cultural power of music to create a greener and safer planet.

GMA’s new patrons include Midnight Oil’s Rob Hirst, ARIA Award-winning Missy Higgins, First Nations cultural leader Rhonda Roberts, singer-songwriter and activist John Butler, Eurovision contender Montaigne (Jessica Cerro) and songstress Katie Noonan.

In addition to the announcement about its ambassadors, GMA issued a call out to the wider sector for those with experience in fundraising, partnerships or law to consider joining the GMA Board. It particularly encouraged those with First Nations roots and diverse backgrounds to apply as these voices will be central to decision making.

Hirst said by providing the soundtrack for the “rewilding” of the Earth, the group will help save current and future generations.

‘They say we don’t inherit the Earth, we borrow it from our children. As it stands in 2021, our children have a right to be angry and afraid: recent generations of humans have trashed the planet – choking its once mighty rivers and oceans with plastic, bleaching its precious coral reefs, melting its frozen ice-caps, and destroying its extraordinary diversity of land and sea-life. Green Music is one of the pathways back from certain ecocide. Through our words, melodies and beats we can collectively inspire the urgent turnaround we need to reverse climate change, species loss and habitat destruction,” he said.

Higgins also expressed her support of the cause.

“Being a travelling musician with a conscience, it’s so great to have Green Music Australia providing us (and our fans) with some specific resources with which we can try to tread more lightly on the planet.”

Rhoda Roberts AO, a Widjabul woman of the Bundjalung Nation, noted the power of music to help people connect and reflect.

“Music is a universal language. We have always harnessed the voice of the song lines – that guided us across country, lyrics providing knowledge, joy and reflection – always reminding us of what we have and what we need to nurture. From the great classics to the next wave of creative song writers, in the 21st, Green Music is an organisation that proudly continues to make us think , reflect, and celebrate the global new song lines. We would be bereft without the music,” she said.

Butler, a longstanding activist and advocate, said he’s happy to be working alongside such fine individuals, dedicated to making real positive change.

“Green Music Australia do such great work in facilitating artists and community to get involved in the issues and campaigns that really matter throughout our great red land,” he added.

Montaigne, meanwhile, noted the potential power and influence of the music industry in this arena.

“The music industry is of great influence, defining culture and producing events globally which shape people’s experience of life and the world around them. For a long time those productions have been highly consumptive without any awareness of what that means for our ecosystems nor the privilege of land use, especially in places like Australia where all land is Indigenous, but has been stolen by colonisers,” she said.

“GMA provides a structure for those in the industry to become aware, and facilitates action that someone might want to take to green their practice. Maybe even influencing fans or consumers. It’s important.”

Noonan said the mission of GMA was vital.

‘Now, more than ever, protecting our home – our precious planet – and its inhabitants is vital for us all. I have been a proud GMA member since its inception and encourage all musicians to join our journey. As Uncle Kev said ‘From little things big things grow’ – all of us making small changes collectively is how we change our world.’

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